Oracle Database 12.2. It is close to 25 million lines of C code. What an unimaginable horror! You can't change a single line of code in the product without breaking 1000s of existing tests. Generations of programmers have worked on that code under difficult deadlines and filled the code with all kinds of crap.


It could be possible for any website to access this data. This vulnerability is called JSON hijacking, and allows websites to extract the JSON data from those API's.


Cloudflare has a cloud computing platform called Workers. Unlike essentially every other cloud computing platform I know of, it doesn’t use containers or virtual machines. We believe that is the future of Serverless and cloud computing in general, and I’ll try to convince you why.


This limitation, which is still found in the very latest Windows 10, dates back to BEFORE STAR WARS. This bug is as old as Watergate.


Agility is a good thing, no doubt, and the Agile Manifesto isn’t unreasonable. Compared to a straw-man practice called “Waterfall”, Agile is notably superior. Yet, so much of Agile as-practiced is deeply harmful, and I don’t really think that the Agile/Waterfall dichotomy is useful in the first place.


With all the buzz around .NET Core I figured that I should tackle some of the fundamental issues that make .NET Core a gamechanger. .NET Core really is the next generation of .NET development and I believe that it’s time for .NET developers everywhere to migrate!


Modern authentication and authorization protocols use tokens as a method of carrying just enough data to either authorize a user to execute an action or request data from a resource. In short, tokens are packets of information that allow some authorization process to be carried out.


CTEs are persisted temporary data sets, that allow you to store a single query to go back to later in your script. They're underrated compared to the subquery, that seems to be what most analysts around me use. Here's why I prefer to use CTEs when building SQL queries.