In terms of sheer quantity, most software is written below the waterline, deep in the bowels of companies that don’t sell software, but need it anyway. That’s the world of internal software development. And internal software development, in-house software shops, have a problem. Well, they have lots of problems, but we’re going to focus on one today: Internal Billing and the Billable Hour.


To completely remove programmers from the equation would require essentially a human level artificial intelligence. And if I start seeing near sentient robots walking around, my first thought is certainly not going to be, “oh no, it’s going to take my job!”


Being immersed in the JavaScript frameworks world can be intimidating. Today, I will try to demystify a few concepts and perhaps at the same time answer some questions that someone starting with Angular2 will most probably have. The framework is mature enough at this point in time to be able share some of the basics, but useful, things that one should have in mind when using it.


Azure Functions is serverless computing offer by Microsoft. Functions by Microsoft implementation are scripts that can be written in JavaScript, C#, F#, Python, PHP, Bash, Batch or PowerShell. Functions can be developed on Visual Studio using preview level tools or directly through browser in Azure portal. This blog post introduces Azure Functions and shows how to build your first function.


The ng-repeat directive in Angular 1.x allows us to iterate over a collection of data and print out DOM nodes that respond to that data. If the data changes, the DOM changes as well. In this guide we'll be converting an Angular 1.x ng-repeat directive across to Angular 2's ngFor directive.


A few weeks ago, researchers announced SHAttered, the first collision of the SHA-1 hash function. Starting today, all SHA-1 computations on GitHub.com will detect and reject any Git content that shows evidence of being part of a collision attack. This ensures that GitHub cannot be used as a platform for performing collision attacks against our users.


The Entity Framework DbEntityEntry object lets you do all sorts of things you probably didn't think were possible, including getting the latest data from the database (without losing your current data) and invoking the .NET Framework validation subsystem.


There's runtime bundling on ASP.NET 4.x but in recent years web developers have used tools like Grunt or Gulp to orchestrate a client-side build process to squish their assets. The key is to find a balance that gives you easy access to development versions of JS/CSS assets when at dev time, while making it "zero work" to put minified stuff into production. Additionally, some devs don't need the Grunt/Gulp/npm overhead while others absolutely do. So how do you find balance? Here's how it works.