Writing Windows 8 Apps With C# and XAML
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Reimagined for full-screen and touch-optimized apps, Windows 8 provides a platform for reaching new users in new ways. In response, programming legend Charles Petzold is rewriting his classic Programming Windows—one of the most popular programming books of all time—to show developers how to use existing skills and tools to build Windows 8 apps.

Programming Windows, Sixth Edition focuses on creating Windows 8 apps accessing the Windows Runtime with XAML and C#. The book also provides C++ code samples. The Sixth Edition is organized in two parts:

  • Part I, “Elementals,” begins with the interrelationship between code and XAML, basic event handling, dynamic layout, controls, templates, asynchronous processing, the application bar, control customization, and collections. You should emerge from Part I ready to create sophisticated page-oriented collection-based user interfaces using the powerful ListView and GridView controls.
  • Part II, “Specialties,” explores topics you might not need for every program but are essential to a well-rounded education in Windows 8. These include multitouch, bitmap graphics, interfacing with share and search facilities, printing, working with the sensors (GPS and orientation), text, obtaining input from the stylus (including handwriting recognition), accessing web services, calling Win32 and DirectX functions, and bringing your application to the Windows 8 app store.

Charles Petzold

Charles Petzold wrote the classic Programming Windows, which is currently in its fifth edition and one of the best-known and widely used programming books of all time.
He was honored in 1994 with the Windows Pioneer Award, presented by Microsoft founder Bill Gates and Windows Magazine.
He has been programming with Windows since first obtaining a beta Windows 1.0 SDK in the spring of 1985, and he wrote the very first magazine article on Windows programming in 1986.
Charles is an MVP for Client Application Development and the author of several other books including Code: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software.