I HAVE A FRAMEWORK that I find very helpful in teaching my apprentices how to design. It’s 3 steps: Imitate, Remix, Invent


What a great title. "URLs are UI." Pithy, clear, crisp. Very true. I've been saying it for years. Someone on Twitter said "this is the professional quote of 2017" because they agreed with it. Except Jakob Nielsen said it in 1999. And Tim Berners-Lee said "Cool URIs don't change" in 1998.


If you have ever hosted a website or even administrated a server you'll be very well aware of bad people trying bad things with your stuff.


What could be so difficult about designing a decent date picker? Basically, we just need an input field and an icon that represents a calendar clearly enough, and once the user clicks on that icon, we pop up a little overlay with the days lined up in rows. Right?


In this article we are going to look at how we can squeeze the best performance out of an easily parallelizable problem by rewriting the same basic implementation using some of the most widely used multi-threading tools available in .NET. We will be covering different .NET technologies such as PLINQ, BlockingCollection, Parallel class as well as TPL Dataflow in conjunction with patterns such as MapReduce, ActorModel as well as ProducerConsumer while trying to achieve optimal parallelization and minimize the cost of synchronization between the threads.


Strange as it sounds, the computer of tomorrow could be built around a cup of coffee. The caffeine molecule is just one of the possible building blocks of a 'quantum computer', a new type of computer that promises to provide mind boggling performance that can break secret codes in a matter of seconds.


The bottom line is this: if you're serving anything over an insecure connection you need to be planning how you're going to go HTTPS by default now.


Today's guest on the Data Exposed show is Pedro Lopes, a PM in the SQL Server TIGER team, and he's in the studio today to show off some of the things his team has been working on over the last year to help improve the tooling around SQL Server performance troubleshooting built right into SSMS.